Mackay North School Students join us in the Marine Classroom

By October 30, 2015 August 22nd, 2017 Education, Great Barrier Reef Islands

Early in third term Wildmob had another Mackay Marine Classroom trip this time with 12 students and two teachers from Mackay North State High School. These four day school field work trips are always packed to the brim with activities as well as allowing students to have some down times to explore the area as we saw last year that students felt connected to these islands after visiting with Wild Mob, which increases their likelihood to visit and help in protecting the area.

The first activity of the trip was removing invasive plants from some beach scrub. An area of 4 acres in Western Bay is being restored and maintained by Wildmob and its volunteers to return the beach scrub to its natural state. Mackay North high school removed invasive species from 900m2 of beach scrub. This was 30m of beach front at a place where green turtles are know to nest. The area is looking great.

A marine debris collection at Dinghy Bay was conducted. In 2 hours over 25kg of debris was collected and categorised, then uploaded onto the Tangaroa Blue data base for everyone to view online. These surveys will be viewed by future classes to compare the differences and also the difference between the beaches from when they did their mainland day with Reef Catchments. Dinghy bay is all green zone and the marine life there is thriving, as soon as we set foot on the beach there were turtles swimming in the shallows and baitfish everywhere. At the rocks at the end there was one very big Cowtail stingray and 13, 20cm long shovel nose rays right at the waters edge with a large school of very big mullet swimming around. The students couldn’t believe the amount of marine life about and were so energised that they decided to clean the whole beach, all 300 odd metres of it.

Another part of their school work was a beach profiling activity in Western Bay. Students were shown how to measure the beach and dune slope then did six transects of the beach. This data can be view from year to year to see how the beach is changing through the seasons and how it is impacted by storms in the area. The students do multiple transects and record slope changes in the beach face.

Another part of their school work was a beach profiling activity in Western Bay. Students were shown how to measure the beach and dune slope then did six transects of the beach. This data can be view from year to year to see how the beach is changing through the seasons and how it is impacted by storms in the area. The students do multiple transects and record slope changes in the beach face.

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